Tag Archives: publishers

Collaboration is a Smart Move for Bookshops

O4lob CollaborationLast week, Legend Press launched their ‘Think Independent’ campaign, a move highlighting the independent publisher’s support for independent bookshops.

Speaking to The Bookseller, Tom Chalmers, MD of Legend Press said: “As an independent and innovative publisher we are keen to work closely with independent bookshops. The two should be a natural fit, but often find themselves fighting the same battles separately. The aim of Think Independent is to ensure both publishers and bookshops remain independent but have greater strength through partnership.”

Talking to Oh, for the Love of Bookshops today, Nic Bottomley, the ‘Mr B’ of award-winning Mr B’s Reading Emporium, in Bath, agreed that maintaining a dialogue with publishers, booksellers and authors was a key factor in offering customers something different when looking to enhance the experience of book buying in a bookshop.

Nic said: “I think it’s very important to communicate with publishers, booksellers and authors all the time. It always leads to fun stuff and generally it’s really rewarding, financially as well eventually.”

Championing The Howling Miller, by Finnish author Arto Paasilinna, Mr B’s commissioned a limited hardback edition of the title – all 300 copies have been sold.

Speaking about The Howling Miller, Nic said: “We designed our own cover for this book and this was a collaboration with Canongate. I think it needed to be Canongate because they are the most inventive and creative publisher, so they were the perfect people to do the first one with. Then we did the same thing with Orion for that great British thriller ‘Rogue Male’.”

Customers of Mr B’s loved the idea of owning an edition of a great title that was only available through their bookshop. Visitors to the renowned bookshop also benefit from another imaginative collaborative enterprise. One shelf of the Mr B’s is always dedicated to titles suggested by another bookshop. Invited booksellers from all over the world submit a list of books that they love, or that are selling well in their own stores.

“We used Blackwells in Oxford briefly last summer and one of the books they suggested was a book about mindfulness,” said Nic.

“That happened to be an area where we had poor knowledge and therefore a very small range – suddenly we sold 60 copies of this mindfulness book, just by having it around and on display. We’re learning all the time, and we realised that there was an untapped desire for books like that amongst our customers.”

Building relationships with publishers, other bookshops and authors can lead to exciting developments that result in building better relationships with your customers. Collaborations are a smart move for bookshops.

Leave a Comment

Filed under The Way Forward for Bookshops

Legend Press Launches the Think Independent Campaign in support of Independent Bookshops

Last week, Legend Press launched their Think Independent campaign, highlighting the independent publisher’s commitment to supporting independent bookshops.

Teach Her by Mark Knotting, part of the Think Independent campaign

Teach Her by Mark Kotting, part of the Think Independent campaign by Legend Press

100 independent bookshops received complimentary copies of Teach Her, the new book by Channel 4 and BBC comedy writer, Mark Kotting, along with postcards and other promotional material. Booksellers were then free to do what they wanted with their copies – sell them, review them, or use them as part of a promotional campaign of their own.

Teach Her was the first of the Legend Press titles to be distributed as part of the campaign, but others will follow throughout the summer.

Speaking to the The Bookseller, Tom Chalmers MD of Legend Press said: “As an independent and innovative publisher we are keen to work closely with independent bookshops.  The two should be a natural fit, but often find themselves fighting the same battles separately. The aim of Think Independent is to ensure both publishers and bookshops remain independent but have greater strength through partnership.”

Teach Her was released on 1st May priced at £7.99

Legend Press Publicity director, Lucy Chamberlain can give further details to any independent bookshop keen to get involved via lucychamberlain(Replace this parenthesis with the @ sign)legend-paperbooks.co.uk

Leave a Comment

Filed under News

Is it time to rethink the Paper vs Digital reading debate?

In a bold statement to the Oxford literary festival last month, Tim Waterstone voiced his opinion that the e-book revolution is going into decline, and the physical book was not going to disappear into obscurity.

Figures from the US last year appeared to suggest that e-book sales were plateauing, a fact perhaps welcomed by James Daunt, managing director of Waterstones, in defence of his decision to sell e-readers and e-books through his stores.

I think anyone who loves books will be glad to hear that the digital reading revolution will not hit the critical tipping point against traditional paper books, and the love of books in their physical form endures.

In 2013, British consumers spent £300 million on 80 million e-books compared with £2.2 billion on 323 million physical books.

But the technology is here, and it is here to stay. Is it time to stop pitting e-books against traditional books and accept there are pros and cons to both forms and a place for both for many book-lovers. Can the digital revolution be seen as a cleansing ‘ice age’ of the bookselling industry, as we emerge through the other side with a more harmonious balance between booksellers and consumers? Is now the time, for bookshops and publishers to rethink the paper vs digital debate, and perhaps question how best traditional bookselling and e-book selling might be combined for a brighter future for all?

In an post for the Guardian Books Blog, Nick Harkaway suggests “Rather than circling the wagons as other media industries did (to no good outcome, it has to be acknowledged) publishers need to learn the more recent lessons from film and music and consider, for example, providing digital copies as standard with hardback editions”

This would seem to me to be a very sensible approach. The paper vs digital debate would now (or imminently) seem to be redundant, and perhaps the question for booksellers should be ‘how can we sell paper books and e-books together?’

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under E-books